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scandal. cameron's also close to news international's ceo rebecca brooks. >> he is a neighbor, a friend, but i deemed the relationship to be wholly appropriate. >> reporter: in her own interrogation, tuesday brooks admitted something went wrong at the tabloid and described allegations of hacking into murder victims phones as pretty horrific. the prime minister had to cut short a trip to africa for this emergency meeting at parliament to stand the growing criticism about his relationship with the murdoch empire. >> that you have had frequent meetings with prime ministers in your career. in the period after the arrest -- >> i would say leave me alone. >> reporter: during three hours of testimony murdoch apologized for the role "news of the world" employees allegedly played in tapping the voice mails but the media mogul said he's not responsible for what he called the fiasco over the hacking. >> who is responsible? >> the people i trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> reporter: murdoch says he has no plans to step down from his multibillion-dollar global empire. this
on conditions that they keep quiet. after the murdochs, their former british ceo rebekah brooks will face the committee. brooks, as editor of "news of the world" newspaper when the hacking was taking place was a hands-on manager. >> rebekah brooks knows the answers to all of these questions. she knows who knew what about what payments, when. she knows everything. >> reporter: however, brooks may not say very much today because she was arrested over the weekend and though out on bail now, will be acutely aware she's involved in a criminal inquiry. now, the murdochs are still speaking to the committee and what we have heard so far indicates they are going to say that they did not know what was going on at the company, that they, themselves, as executives, were misled. >> elizabeth palmer in london, thanks. >>> joining "uss is lanny davis who is special counsel to president bill clinton in the white house. we have been watching this unfold the last half hour or spoke. now, all of a sudden, you have rupert murdoch coming out and saying this is the most humble day of his life. he is striking t
british c.e.o. rebecca brooks and his son james face questions from investigators about what they knew and when. in the u.s. where rupert murdoch has his corporate headquarters, three u.s. senators are now asking the american attorney general to look into whether or not the company might have been breaking the law, especially with these allegations of police payoffs. >> mitchell: a lot of people are asking how could the u.s. congress call for something like that over a law that may have been broken overseas. >> reporter: there's a piece of federal legislation, the foreign corrupt practice act that outlaws bribery by american corporations no matter where the world they are operating. >> mitchell: i see. liz palmer, thank you very much. coming up, a big setback today for libyan rebels. our mark philips is on the front lines. women's pro soccer, the biggest goal: survival. and how the space shuttle helped us see the universe as we have never seen it before. when the "cbs evening news" continues. at a time. that's how it is with alzheimer's disease. she needs help from me. and her medicati
, including murdoch's son james, and the former c.e.o. rebekah brooks who was arrested on the weekend. she and cameron are neighbors who travel in the same circles. today he was forced to deny he had ever invited her for a sleep-over. >> i've never held a slumber party or seen her in her pajamas. >> reporter: cameron was bloodied, shall we say, in parliament today, but not broken. however this thing is far from over. his enemies expect more damaging allegations to surface when the judicial led inquiry into phone hacking gets under way. russ? >> mitchell: elizabeth palmmer in london, thank you. turns out that hacking into voice mail in the united states is pretty easy. depending on your phone carrier. bill whitaker looked into that. >> reporter: the targets of the tabloid hacking scandal included british royals, commoners and screen actors like hugh grant. >> i this think is the water shed moment. >> reporter: but don't think it's just the scourge of the celebrated and sensational on the other side of the atlantic. your phone and my phone can be hacked. >> my ex-girlfriend found her way int
international chief executive rebekah brooks also bowed to pressure to step down. yesterday the media mogul apologized in person after meeting the family of murdered school girl milly dowler whose phone was hacked by "news of the world" in 2002. >> founder of the company, i was appalled to find out what had happened. >> reporter: tuesday brooks and rupert murdoch and his son, james, will be grilled by a parliamentary committee about what they knew. tom watson, a member of parliament who will question them, told me the apologies are late and hollow. >> every week, every month there's been a new revelation they've denied and subsequently had to admit. it's a half apology i'm afraid. >> parliament said on tuesday don't expect the murdochs will answer any and all questions because of an ongoing criminal investigation, but they will be pressed if they try to dodge basic probing with regard to what they knew and when. >> thank you. also is lloyd grove, editor at large for "newsweek" magazine and the daily beast. lloyd great to have you with us >> good morning. >> we've seen the two high-profile r
of athletic clothes. i mean, i wear my yoga pants for everything. hiking, biking, pilates... [ woman ] brooke... okay. i wear yoga pants because i am too lazy for real pants. that's my tide. what's yours? but they'd rather they disappear. mott's medleys has two total fruit and veggie servings in every glass but magically looks and tastes just like the fruit juice kids already love. mott's medleys. invisible vegetables. magical taste. >>> in this morning's "healthwatch dwherkts mammogram debate. breast cancer is the second deadliest form of the disease among women. last year it killed 40,000 americans, but there is still no agreement on how and when and how often to screen for it. on wednesday, the american college of obstetricians and gynecologists say annual mammograms should be offered to all women starting at 40. two years ago, a government panel recommended waiting until age 50. so we're looking for clarity on this life and death issue. we get it from cbs news medical correspondent dr. jennifer ashton and nancy brinker, founder and ceo of the susan g. komen foundation. great to have you b
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6